‘Europe – Cornerstone of Peace’ memorial

20th to 21st century

From Frontline Town to Modern European City

The Charlemagne Prize has been awarded in Aachen since 1950. It has transformed post-war Aachen into a European city of long-standing history.

The Tranchot Obelisk

17th to 19th century

Dawn of the Modern City

In 1794, the Rhineland became French territory. In 1804, Napoleon paid Aachen a visit and presented himself as Charlemagne’s successor in front of the throne at St Mary’s Church.

Fan owned by a visitor to the baths

16th to 17th century

The Baroque Spa City

The spa city of Aachen began to provide a wide range of leisure activities for its well-to-do guests including trails, balls and concerts, a casino, but also factory visits.

Seat of the throne at St Mary’s Church

12th to 16th century

The City of Coronations

Aachen in 1572: The imperial city has grown considerably. The city’s basic outline is defined by two circular city walls. They can still be recognised on maps of Aachen today.

Tessera from St Mary’s Church

8th to 9th century

Charlemagne’s Palace and St Mary’s Church

Charlemagne chose the Aachen Palace, also known as the Pfalz in German, as his permanent residence and turned it into the centre of cultural activity. From 793 to 813, the magnificent St Mary’s Church was built on Charlemagne’s orders.

Stone of dedication from Roman-era Aachen

5th century BCE to 7th century CE

Early Settlements

Around the time before Jesus was born, the Romans founded a small town where Aachen’s hot springs are located. The town, which they called Aquae Granni, soon became a spa town famous far beyond Aachen and its neighbouring areas. As legend has it, it was legate Granus Serenus who discovered the hot springs.

5th century BCE to 7th century CE
8th to 9th century
12th to 16th century
16th to 17th century
17th to 19th century
20th to 21st century

5th century BCE to 7th century CE

Early Settlements

Around the time before Jesus was born, the Romans founded a small town where Aachen’s hot springs are located. The town, which they called Aquae Granni, soon became a spa town famous far beyond Aachen and its neighbouring areas. As legend has it, it was legate Granus Serenus who discovered the hot springs.

Stone of dedication from Roman-era Aachen

8th to 9th century

Charlemagne’s Palace and St Mary’s Church

Charlemagne chose the Aachen Palace, also known as the Pfalz in German, as his permanent residence and turned it into the centre of cultural activity. From 793 to 813, the magnificent St Mary’s Church was built on Charlemagne’s orders.

Tessera from St Mary’s Church

12th to 16th century

The City of Coronations

Aachen in 1572: The imperial city has grown considerably. The city’s basic outline is defined by two circular city walls. They can still be recognised on maps of Aachen today.

Seat of the throne at St Mary’s Church

16th to 17th century

The Baroque Spa City

The spa city of Aachen began to provide a wide range of leisure activities for its well-to-do guests including trails, balls and concerts, a casino, but also factory visits.

Fan owned by a visitor to the baths

17th to 19th century

Dawn of the Modern City

In 1794, the Rhineland became French territory. In 1804, Napoleon paid Aachen a visit and presented himself as Charlemagne’s successor in front of the throne at St Mary’s Church.

The Tranchot Obelisk